Posts Tagged: beauty school

Ace the interview with these 3 tips!

You submitted your cover letter and your resume and you finally got the call; they want to interview you! Now what?? Don’t panic. Here’s what an interview that doesn’t suck looks like from beginning to end:

Your outfit

No matter how stylish, edgy, cool, or awesome the salon, unless there are poles in the floor, a bouncer, velvet ropes, and dollar bills flying through the air, do not dress like a stripper. Before everyone gets offended, being a stripper is a legitimate, money-making job, but there’s this thing in the work world called “dress for the job you want.” That means, if you want to be a super stylish, edgy, cool, awesome stylist, dress like one. If you want to be a stripper, dress like one. It’s pretty simple. “What should I wear, Heather?” Great question. Anything that is clean, unwrinkled, stylish, and doesn’t smell like cigarette smoke or food or anything other than clean clothes. Black is an industry standard and a color you can’t go wrong with (and, p.s., you can buy it in volumes at Kohl’s for dirt cheap in their clearance section). A cute, shrunken jacket paired with a black wife beater or tee shirt, black coated jeans, with black boots or flats is always a cute look. Not into the coated jeans? Pair it with a black pencil skirt and pattered tights. Most important, make sure your hair, makeup, and nails are on point. The salon industry is the fashion industry. Look the part.

The audition

Interviewing for a job is like auditioning for a TV show or a movie; go in there and give them your very best. That means smile, give a firm handshake (not a wussy, sucky, dead fish handshake, or that weird, wussy handshake that looks like you expect them to kiss your hand or something – so weird), lots of eye contact, and speak clearly and articulately. Rehearse if you need to. Ask a friend, a parent, or a trusted mentor to ask you some interview questions and then rehearse your answers. There is nothing wrong with being prepared. In fact, there’s everything RIGHT with being prepared. When we’re hiring, if someone comes in prepared, polished, and on-point, we’re interested. Want the job? Be that person.

Come in with a list of your own questions. “What kind of questions, Heather?” Great question. Questions like this: What are the qualities of the ideal assistant (or, whatever position you’re applying for)? Will I be interviewing with other team members? Who makes the final hiring decision? What does a typical day look like? Can you describe it? What made you decide to open your own salon? What keeps you inspired? Do you have a favorite industry icon? If you had to start your career over, what would your now-self tell to your then-self to focus on? By asking questions like that instead of, “How much am I going to make? Am I going to get tipped out? Can I take off the week of Thanksgiving to travel with my parents? Can I leave early? Am I expected to stay even if all the clients are gone and I’m done? When will I get my own chair?” When you ask the salon owner or manager about their career, their inspiration, you’re showing them that you’re not a selfish, suck employee. You’re building rapport, developing trust and relationship, and letting them know that you are a career driven, interested, team member. People enjoy talking about themselves and their successes – especially successful people – but most people don’t want to appear like their bragging. So, by asking someone about their success, you’re giving them permission to brag and to feel good about their accomplishments. #winning

After the interview

Make sure you send a real, handwritten thank you card to whoever you interviewed with that says something like this: Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule to meet with me. I really enjoyed our conversation, and getting to learn more Salon Blah Blah and how it came to be was truly inspiring. Please keep me in mind if any opportunities become available at Salon Blah Blah. I would love to be a part of your amazing team. Warm regards, Your namn this world of digital, nothing sets a candidate apart like receiving a gorgeous Papyrus card (you can find them at Target) with a handwritten note inside. You’re welcome.

Here’s to getting the job and not sucking at it!

How not to have a sucky resume

So, how many of you didn’t suck this week at work because of what you learned here last week? Hopefully, all of you. This week we’re gonna go over how to put together a kick ass, un-sucky resume. Ya ready?

Accurate contact information

“What does that mean, Heather?” Accurate contact information means your current telephone number, your current address, and an email address that you actually open and read. “But, Heather, I have like five email addresses that I made when I was like eleven. They’re all filled with spam and I can’t remember the passwords anyway.” I know, I know, so don’t give them those email addresses. Instead, go to www.google.com and create a gmail account that you use only for job searches. It should be your firstname.lastname@gmail.com, period. If that is taken, do your lastname.firstname@gmail.com, or firstnamelastnamecareersearch@gmail.com (that should work). Just make sure it’s profesh, easy for someone else to type, and you check it every day. If you don’t want this email address to go to the email cemetery (the place where all the unused email addresses go after they’re filled to the brim with spam), don’t use it for online shopping, in store shopping, school, friends, or anything other than your job searches.

Let’s move on to your telephone number. Obviously, the number you put on your resume should be a telephone number where you can be reached easily – ie. your cell phone number. Make sure a.) that your voicemail message is a professional one, and b.) that if you don’t recognize the number but you answer it anyway, you answer it like a nice, normal person, not someone who sounds caught off guard, suspicious, or otherwise unfriendly. “What do you mean, Heather?” I’m so glad you asked. Allow me to provide examples of voicemail messages that suck:

Brrrrrrrrrrrrrringgggg: Voicemail picks up (latest pop song playing in the background is the first thing heard) then “Whut up? This is Alexis. Can’t get to the phone. Leave your number and I’ll call you back.”

Brrrrrrrrrrrrringgggg: Voicemail picks up (gritty, low voice) “Yoooo. Can’t talk. Leave them digits and I’ll holla back.”

They are both examples of unprofessional voicemails. I’m not saying you have to sound like your mom or some corporate drone, but sound like you want the job. Now, on to how-to answer the phone when you don’t recognize the number without sounding like you’re trying to screen your calls, avoid a bill collector, or afraid it’s your baby daddy’s new girl: “Hello!” Yup. It’s that simple. Just say hello in a friendly, happy voice. They’ll ask to speak to you and if it’s the job you’ve been waiting to hear from, you’ll sound happy and upbeat, possibly even excited, and they’ll hear that enthusiasm in your voice. And, if it turns out to be the bill collector you’ve been trying to avoid, you can pretend you’re not yourself (“This is her sister, she can’t get to the phone.”) or, if it’s your baby daddy’s new girl, you can go from nice to nasty in a hot second. #problemsolved

Your Education

Here’s where you can connect all the awesome things you did in school to the job you’re seeking. Oh, wait, you didn’t do anything awesome in school? No worries – we’ll cover that in a later post. When putting together your resume, make sure you put your most recent education first. Now, I’m not talking about recent certifications or non-credit classes. I’m talking about official education; high school, college, beauty school, technical school, etc. Here’s an example:

Pulse Beauty Academy, Downingtown, Pennsylvania 2013 to 2014 Graduated: Diploma (received license from PA State Board of Cosmetology after passing both theory and practical exams in October of 2014)

Bishop Shanahan High School Downingtown, Pennsylvania 2010 to 2013 Graduated: High School Diploma

The most recent education is listed first with the credential received. The education prior to the most recent is listed after with the credential received. “But, Heather, I didn’t finish college. How am I supposed to put that on my resume without looking like I suck?” That’s a great question. If you attended college (or, any other school after high school) put the name and address of the school in the same format I did above but where the word graduated is put studied instead, and list the subjects you studied or the degree you were working toward. Then during your interview you can explain why you didn’t complete your degree. “But where do I put the classes where I received a certification?” Another great question. Certifications can go directly after the education heading and education content under its own heading: Certifications. K? Cool.

Your work experience

Oh, man, this is where a lot of resumes fall apart and really start to suck which really sucks because this is where your resume really needs to shine. “What do you mean, Heather?” Let me give you an example. Most people just list the tasks they were required to do at their job: sweep floors, greet customers, file, answer phones. “But, Heather, I wasn’t the CEO. I was the cashier and the stock person.” I get it, but was that all you were? Think back and answer the following questions: Did you smile? Did you help customers pick out costumes? Did you provide excellent customer service? Did you sweep the store in between customers? Did you Windex the door and windows when it was slow? Did you ask your boss for extra responsibilities? Did you come in when you weren’t scheduled if they asked you? Did you go above and beyond? (P.S. Pay attention here because this is where a superstar will stand out from someone that sucks because this is where a superstar will share all the ambitious, outgoing, kind, helpful, things they did while on their last job.) And, if you didn’t do any of these awesome things at your last job (or, your current one) then a.) you suck, and b.) at least now you’ll know how to shine on the job. You’re welcome.

Formatting your resume

Make it easy to read, don’t make it a cluster, and put it on nice paper (heavy stock). If you’re still not sure about what a great resume should look like, check out some sample resume websites like this one. Remember, you don’t have to be a corporate drone to get a job but, unfortunately, being super creative can sometimes come off as unprofessional. Finding the happy medium is sometimes the toughest part. If you want to know if your resume sucks, feel free to email me a copy of yours and I’ll let you know.

Here’s to another week of not sucking at work!

Three words that strike fear in the heart of a hairstylist.

I have the pleasure of spending most of my days at our beauty school with some of the most amazing people in the world: cosmetology students. We call them Future Professionals, a term Paul Mitchell School’s pioneered more than a decade ago. During a recent professional development class I taught, we talked about the service cycle and some of the things that can make it successful. “A great cut,” responded one Future Professional. “An awesome blow-dry and style,” responded another. “What about great communication?” I asked. Met with quizzical looks, I continued my line of questions. “Do you guys talk to your guests about services we offer that they aren’t there for? What about the products you’re using on them – do you talk to you guest about them?” No one was talking. “How about rebooking and recommending products – you’re doing that, right?” The anxiety in the room was palpable. Since performing these tasks during a service is part of the service and education experience, I was a bit concerned that they weren’t engaging in these important steps and wanted to get to the bottom of their reluctance. “Why aren’t you guys doing these basic things, guys?” I looked around the room and finally someone spoke up. “I don’t like when people tell me no.”

Fear of rejection is a common fear and is the most potent and distressing of every day events, according to psychologists, and is experienced in friendships, romantic relationships, and in the workplace. It’s no wonder After all, most of us associate the word no with rejection, and who likes to be rejected? But statistically speaking, you have a 50/50 chance that the answer will be yes and in our industry, as in countless others, yes = income. I’ll give you some real world examples of places where a yes answer would add dollars to a business’s bottom line:

At the register at Old Navy: Cashier asks, “Would you like to save 15% on your purchase today by opening an Old Navy card?” If the person says no – no big deal. If the person says yes and gets approved – they have an open line of credit and are more likely to make purchases. #makingmoney

At the register at Barnes & Noble: Cashier asks, “Would you like to get valuable coupons by sharing your email address with us?” If the person says no – no big deal. If the person says yes, they receive coupons encourage them to come to the store and spend money. #making money

At McDonald’s: Cashier asks, “Would you like to make that a large for just $2.00 more?” If the person says no – they’ll live longer. Ha ha. If the person says yes, McDonald’s just made $2.00 more than they would have made had the cashier not asked. #makingsensenow

Okay, now I want you to imagine the financial ramifications to each of the companies I used in the example above if the add-on questions were never asked. Old Navy is owned by Gap, Inc., and according to their Annual Shareholder’s report their net sales for 2012 were $15.7 billion. McDonald’s? $6.5 billion. Barnes & Noble? $6.8 billion. A huge percentage of the sales that occur in those companies come from their front line people asking those important, revenue generating, questions. And, in addition, customers expect to be asked to “add-on” to whatever it is they’re buying; they won’t be surprised or offended if you ask. In fact, if you leave off that important add-on question, some might wonder why they weren’t asked!

This week set a goal to ask at least one customer per day an add-on question – one that will increase your ticket, your retail, or your rebooking. Then, share your results with me here. I’d love to hear your success stories!

Blood in the water: One of the things killer salespeople know about sales that you don’t.

I love killer salespeople.
You know the type –  they sneak up on you and sell the sh*t out of you, leave you standing there, empty wallet in hand, “I ain’t mad at cha” playing in your head. I have mad respect for killer salespeople. The aesthetician who did my facial and sold me an expensive facial package before the one I was getting was complete? Killer salesperson. The massage therapist who sold me an annual membership to the massage studio even though I secretly loathe getting massages? Killer salesperson. Though not what most would consider salespeople in the traditional sense of the word, there’s a common thread linking these everyday sales ninjas together; they understand why their customers buy and that understanding keeps them counting greenbacks all the way to the bank. But, If understanding why customers buy is so important and can drive sales, how come it’s so often ignored? And, what is ignoring it costing in terms of lost sales? Here, a quick story of how a killer salesperson at the Chanel counter’s understanding of the why increases sales, creates happy customers, and pads her paycheck may illustrate it best.
A quick trip to the Chanel counter for foundation usually goes something like this:
Salesperson: “Welcome to Chanel. What can I get you today?”
Me: “Foundation.”
Salesperson: “Which one are you using?”
I respond, they get it for me, transaction complete.
But every few months I have a run-in with their killer salesperson (cue theme music from Jaws here):
Salesperson: Thick accent, “Welcome to Chanel! It’s so good to see you again!” Immediately, a look of concern crosses her face. “Oh.” She sounds disappointed. “Dry skin (as she touches my cheek)? The weather has been so unreasonable, no?” 
Me: My shoulders slump. 
Salesperson: “Mmmm.” More disappointment. “Anti-aging (as she taps under my chin).” It’s not a question, rather an order. 
Me: “Well, my skin is kind of dry…” She smells blood in the water.
Salesperson: “I know, darling, I noticed right away. Not that you’re not stunning, of course, but I have somesing that will make you so radiant, so beautiful, take years off your face…I will get it for you right away.” She rushes away leaving me in her Chanel-scented wake, desperate to be hydrated and young, wallet open, credit card poised. 
We eventually get to why I’m there (the foundation, remember?) but that’s after I’ve agreed enthusiastically to the $450 worth of products she slathered onto, and massaged into, my face, and I wasn’t even mad. In the words of Salt n Peppa, “I give props to those who deserve it.” She recognized my need (to feel good about my skin, cover my imperfections, look hydrated and young, and spend money), and my problem (my dry skin, my aging skin, my lack of foundation) and satisfied both. #winning
Okay, so how can understanding why the customer buys translate to the salon? Let’s consider the service desk coordinator’s role in the client’s purchasing decision. Oftentimes, the receptionist has the opportunity to interact with the guest before the stylist, but the average service desk coordinator looks up from her magazine at the guest looking at products in the retail area and then goes back to her magazine. After looking up a second time, she may ask (halfheartedly), “Did you need any help finding anything?” to which the answer is usually, “No.” Now, based on the Chanel counter sales experience I shared, what could the service desk coordinator do differently? How about walk out from behind the desk and approach the guest? “Mrs. Jones, it’s great to see you! I’d love to help you choose a product today. Tell me, what is it about your hair that you’re not in love with right now?” The service desk coordinator’s dialogue with the guest creates opportunities to discover how she can a.) satisfy a need or b.) solve a problem. A tiny change in what she does can actually increase sales!
This weekend, brainstorm some ideas on how you can up your sales game and become a killer salesperson. Rehearse the examples of sales dialogue, record yourself or role play with a colleague or friend, then pick one thing to implement this week. After you’ve tried your strategy, let me know how you did. I’d love to hear!

Going Down? You’re face to face with your dream client – what now?

Elevator pitch. You’ve all heard the expression before but may be wondering, what exactly is an elevator pitch?

An elevator pitch can best be defined as your verbal business card, your sixty seconds of fame, and a great one can mean the difference between getting clients or scaring clients away. Meant to create excitement or, to create desire in a potential client to want to learn more about you or your company, a lot of elevator pitches do the exact opposite simply because the language used was dull or boring. Or, maybe the language was colorful and descriptive but the person’s down-trodden tone of voice and defeated attitude dropped the bottom out of what could have been an awesome elevator pitch. Wondering what a bad one might sound like? Here’s an example of a dull, boring pitch to the question, “What do you do for a living?”:

“I work at Pulse Beauty Academy. It’s a cosmetology school in Downingtown.” 

Wow. Underwhelming, right? Pretty sure the person wouldn’t be interested in an amazing career in the beauty industry after that response. An example of a better elevator pitch might be:

“I’m a DayMaker at Pulse Beauty Academy in Downingtown. It’s where people who want to have the most exciting and successful careers in beauty, fashion, and business come to get educated.” Or:

“In the most amazing industry on earth; where people achieve their dreams, have fun, make money, and live beautifully.” 

The last two sound a thousand times better than the first response, right? Now, I’m not suggesting that every person you come in contact with will be a potential lead, but you never know who knows who knows who…so, this week, challenge yourself to develop your elevator pitch. And, if you already have one, challenge yourself to develop a better one, head into your local Starbucks and test yours out. Share your successes and fails here – I’d love to hear about them!