Posts Tagged: success

You got the job! Want to know how to succeed?

Congratulations! You submitted your awesome resume, aced the job interview, and now you’ve got the job! Wanna know how to keep your job? Don’t suck at it. Here are a few tips to get you started.

  • #behappy. These days there are literally tens of thousands of memes and books and posters about having a great attitude but, oddly, I still know lots of people with shitty attitudes. Listen, there are countless resources on how not to have a shitty attitude, so if you have a shitty attitude, get a clue. Stat.  An awesome attitude is everything but it’s more than everything at work. Bosses love employees with great attitudes.
  • Smile. A lot. Chances are if you’re smiling, people will think you’re happy. I’ll give you an example; we have a woman on our team who I’ve never seen have a bad day. In the 18 months she’s been with us, she’s shared that her life is less than perfect but she is always smiling. She’s always professional, she’s always at work, she’s always doing what she’s supposed to be doing (and then some), and she’s never had a bad day at work. That, my friends, is what being a professional is all about. So, no matter how shitty your situation is at home or anywhere else, when you come to work act like it’s the best shit in the world.
  • “Is there anything else I can do?” Even if you don’t want to do anything else, just ask. If you’ve taken my advice and you’re smiling a lot and have an awesome attitude, if you ask your boss if there’s anything else you can do she’ll probably say no because she loves you! Or, if she gives you something else to do it’s because she wants to give you more responsibilities because she wants to grow you! Asking if you can do anything else makes you look like a boss because you’re being a team player and everyone loves a team player. Want job security? Ask if there’s anything else you can do.
  • Don’t. Have. Issues. Please. Employees that are issues-prone are employees no employer wants. Employees with issues call out sick all the time. They come in late all the time. They don’t do their job well because they’re distracted because of their issues. They are always the center of (negative) attention. They think their issues will make up for their lack of performance so they don’t get their issues under control.  Want job security? Make sure when you’re at work you are issue free, whether you actually are or not. #nodrama
  • Avoid pointing out everything that’s wrong. Five words: be your company’s biggest fan. Or…
  • Find a company where you can be their biggest fan. If you don’t believe in your company, your company’s products, your company’s vision or mission statement, or your boss, you are taking away an opportunity from someone who will. In other words, if you aren’t on board, get off the ship. No one wants an employee who acts like they’re all in and then as soon as the boss walks away starts talking smack about how much the place sucks, how much they hate the boss, how bad the products suck, how much they hate the customers, etc. If you are doing that then you shouldn’t be at that company. Period. I don’t care if there aren’t any jobs out there, if you’re making tons of money, if you’re in line for a promotion; if your attitude about your company suck, then your performance sucks. And, if your performance sucks then your company will be perceived as sucky. You have to love your company, what it stands for, what it sells, what it aims to be. You have to love it and believe in it so much that when its shoulders sag, you’re there to build it back up and remind if of how awesome it is, or how it’s going to get awesome again. If you want job security, be your company’s biggest cheerleader. Let your boss hear you cheering from the sidelines when there are 3 seconds left in the 4th quarter and he or she is about to kick a field goal for the win.

Here’s to not sucking at work!

Three words that strike fear in the heart of a hairstylist.

I have the pleasure of spending most of my days at our beauty school with some of the most amazing people in the world: cosmetology students. We call them Future Professionals, a term Paul Mitchell School’s pioneered more than a decade ago. During a recent professional development class I taught, we talked about the service cycle and some of the things that can make it successful. “A great cut,” responded one Future Professional. “An awesome blow-dry and style,” responded another. “What about great communication?” I asked. Met with quizzical looks, I continued my line of questions. “Do you guys talk to your guests about services we offer that they aren’t there for? What about the products you’re using on them – do you talk to you guest about them?” No one was talking. “How about rebooking and recommending products – you’re doing that, right?” The anxiety in the room was palpable. Since performing these tasks during a service is part of the service and education experience, I was a bit concerned that they weren’t engaging in these important steps and wanted to get to the bottom of their reluctance. “Why aren’t you guys doing these basic things, guys?” I looked around the room and finally someone spoke up. “I don’t like when people tell me no.”

Fear of rejection is a common fear and is the most potent and distressing of every day events, according to psychologists, and is experienced in friendships, romantic relationships, and in the workplace. It’s no wonder After all, most of us associate the word no with rejection, and who likes to be rejected? But statistically speaking, you have a 50/50 chance that the answer will be yes and in our industry, as in countless others, yes = income. I’ll give you some real world examples of places where a yes answer would add dollars to a business’s bottom line:

At the register at Old Navy: Cashier asks, “Would you like to save 15% on your purchase today by opening an Old Navy card?” If the person says no – no big deal. If the person says yes and gets approved – they have an open line of credit and are more likely to make purchases. #makingmoney

At the register at Barnes & Noble: Cashier asks, “Would you like to get valuable coupons by sharing your email address with us?” If the person says no – no big deal. If the person says yes, they receive coupons encourage them to come to the store and spend money. #making money

At McDonald’s: Cashier asks, “Would you like to make that a large for just $2.00 more?” If the person says no – they’ll live longer. Ha ha. If the person says yes, McDonald’s just made $2.00 more than they would have made had the cashier not asked. #makingsensenow

Okay, now I want you to imagine the financial ramifications to each of the companies I used in the example above if the add-on questions were never asked. Old Navy is owned by Gap, Inc., and according to their Annual Shareholder’s report their net sales for 2012 were $15.7 billion. McDonald’s? $6.5 billion. Barnes & Noble? $6.8 billion. A huge percentage of the sales that occur in those companies come from their front line people asking those important, revenue generating, questions. And, in addition, customers expect to be asked to “add-on” to whatever it is they’re buying; they won’t be surprised or offended if you ask. In fact, if you leave off that important add-on question, some might wonder why they weren’t asked!

This week set a goal to ask at least one customer per day an add-on question – one that will increase your ticket, your retail, or your rebooking. Then, share your results with me here. I’d love to hear your success stories!